Facebook Officially Replaces Adobe Flash With HTML5 For Videos

Many tech giants are really bent on doing off with the services of Adobe Flash — majorly owing to the format’s disturbing amount of bugs as well as security flaws. And, in a span of time not up to six months after Facebook Chief Security Officer had made proclamations seeking Flash to get an end-date, the company officially announced that every of its videos will load through HTML5 by default.

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  “We are continuing to work together with Adobe to deliver a reliable and secure Flash experience for games on our platform,” Facebook front-end engineer Daniel Baulig wrote in a blog post, “but have shipped the change for video to all browsers by default.” In the time past, HTML5 was responsible for the heavy lifting for Web video surfaces, among which was video for Newsfeed as well as various Pages, but didn’t work commendably enough on older browsers — as a result of this, some of Facebook’s content had to load in Flash. Nonetheless, the company has gone about extensive debugging to officially make HTML5 the default across the board.

“We decided to initially launch the HTML5 player to only a small set of browsers, and continuously roll out to more browsers, versions, and operating systems as we improved it and fixed small bugs,” Baulig said. In the long term, Baulig made the explanations that the switch has introduced pace to the videos, making them faster, increased reliability, making it more acceptable with less complaints.

On the development side, the switch makes premise for the team to adequately exploit Facebook’s HTML5 tools, like jest and WebDriver. Not only did launching the HTML5 video player bring about easier development, it has a also increased the appeal of video experience for people on Facebook. Videos can now begin to play with greater speed. People comment, like, as well as share more on videos after the switch, and users have been reporting fewer bugs. From the look of thing, People seem to be spending more time with video because of it. So the slow death of Flash runs on in continuity, and an increase number of people get access to less buggy video content.

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